Effect of Selegiline Administration on the Urinary Excretion of Dopamine-Derived Tetrahydroisoquinoline Alkaloids in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

  • Philippe Dostert
  • Didier Deffond
  • Renata La Croix
  • Didier Vernay
  • Margherita Strolin Benedetti
  • Gerard Dordain
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

It has long been suggested that, in humans, the biosynthesis of salsolinol (Sal), a dopamine (DA)-derived isoquinoline alkaloid, might occur by condensation of DA with acetaldehyde or with pyruvic acid followed by oxidative decarboxylation and reduction (Figure 1). Sal possesses an asymmetric center at C-1 and exists as R and S enantiomers. There is supportive evidence that, at least in healthy subjects under physiological conditions, Sal biosynthesis should result from the condensation of DA with pyruvic acid: 1) 1-carboxysalsolinol and 1,2-dehydrosalsolinol (DSal) have been detected in human brain and urine together with Sal (Sjöquist and Ljungquist, 1985; Ung-Chhun et al., 1985; Dostert et al., 1990a); and 2) the presence of only the R enantiomer of Sal in urine of healthy subjects (Dostert et al., 1991) would not be consistent with this compound arising from the non-enzymic condensation of DA with acetaldehyde.

Keywords

Pyruvic Acid Sodium Metabisulfite Semicarbazide Hydrochloride Daily Urinary Excretion Platelet Monoamine Oxidase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philippe Dostert
    • 1
  • Didier Deffond
    • 2
  • Renata La Croix
    • 1
  • Didier Vernay
    • 2
  • Margherita Strolin Benedetti
    • 1
  • Gerard Dordain
    • 2
  1. 1.Farmitalia Carlo ErbaResearch & DevelopmentMilanItaly
  2. 2.Service of NeurologyHôpital NordClermont-FerrandFrance

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