Cerebral Blood Flow at Rest and During Cognitive Activation in Patients with Moderate Dementia of Alzheimer’s Type

  • Alfredo Postiglione
  • Andrea Soricelli
  • Simona De Chiara
  • Maurizio Romano
  • Antonio Ruocco
  • Gaetano Pellegrino
  • Giovanna Guiotto
  • Laura Chiacchio
  • Nina Fragrassi
  • Dario Grossi
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

Brain perfusion evaluation by single photon emission tomography (SPECT) is useful in diagnosing patients with dementia of Alzheimer’s type (DAT).1–9 DAT, in fact, is associated with a reduction in global cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism as well as a highly diagnostic finding of a bilateral and almost symmetrical decrease of CBF and metabolism in the parieto-temporal regions.10,11 However, many DAT patients with posterior parieto-temporal flow reduction also have diffuse flow decrease in the frontal cortex area, usually of somewhat asymmetric distribution.12 The temporo-parietal flow reduction is often very asymmetric13,14 with the dominant neurological deficit usually localized on the most affected side of the brain, i.e. with aphasia dominating in the left-sided cases and visuo-spatial apraxia in the right-sided cases.15,16

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Brain Perfusion Single Photon Emission Tomography Precentral Gyrus Cerebral Blood Flow Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfredo Postiglione
    • 1
  • Andrea Soricelli
    • 2
  • Simona De Chiara
    • 1
  • Maurizio Romano
    • 2
  • Antonio Ruocco
    • 1
  • Gaetano Pellegrino
    • 1
  • Giovanna Guiotto
    • 1
  • Laura Chiacchio
    • 3
  • Nina Fragrassi
    • 3
  • Dario Grossi
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Internal Medicine and Metabolic DiseasesFaculty of Medicine, University “Federico II”NaplesItaly
  2. 2.Nuclear Medicine UnitFaculty of Medicine, University “Federico II”NaplesItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Neurological ScienceFaculty of Medicine, University “Federico II”NaplesItaly

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