Calcium Binding Proteins in the Septo-Hippocampal System of the Aged Rat

  • P. Krzywkowski
  • B. Potier
  • M. C. Senut
  • P. Dutar
  • Y. Lamour
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

Neurodegenerative diseases as well as age-related alterations in neuronal functions might be associated with changes in intracellular calcium concentration. Several mechanisms control the intracellular concentration of calcium (voltage or receptor operated calcium channels, membrane ATPases, Na-Ca exchanger, etc). Intracellular calcium buffering is also due in part to calcium-binding proteins such as Parvalbumin (Parv) or Calbindin D28K (CaBP). These proteins are supposed to bind calcium ions and to buffer intracellular calcium rises, thus protecting neurons against the deleterious effects of high intracellular calcium concentrations. Their protective role in epilepsia, ischemia, neuronal degeneration has been suggested (see Heizmann and Braun, 1992). Parvalbumin and Calbindin D28K belong to the EF-hand family of calcium modulated proteins, along with other proteins such as Calmodulin or S 100. Many of these proteins are found in the nervous system of vertebrates. They have different distributions, suggesting different functions. Whereas S 100 beta is a glial protein, Pary and CaBP are found in neurons. There is apparently little overlap between the distributions of Pary and CaBP (Celio, 1990).

Keywords

Pyramidal Cell Medial Septum Pyramidal Cell Layer Pyramidal Layer Calbindin D28K 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Krzywkowski
    • 1
  • B. Potier
    • 1
  • M. C. Senut
    • 1
  • P. Dutar
    • 1
  • Y. Lamour
    • 1
  1. 1.ParisFrance

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