Visual Cognition and Language Function in Alzheimer’s Disease

  • M. Fujii
  • S. Murakami
  • S. Hayashi
  • N. Nakano
  • K. Utsumi
  • R. Fukatsu
  • N. Takahata
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

In Alzheimer’s disease, apart from inscription memory deficit, other high order brain function deficits also appear in the early stage, such as geographical orientation deficit, visual cognition deficit, and organization deficit. These neuropsychological symptoms are rarely seen in other dementiform diseases and are considered to be characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease(AD).4 Among these, organization deficit including constructional disability almost inevitably occur in AD. As this deficit is considered to be closely related to the visual space cognition deficit, we analyzed the visual information processing mechanism for the execution of organization, using newly developed methods such as a vision analyzer.1 The results showed a characteristic fixation movement in AD patients. A concentration of fixation points on the right hand side, and concentration and deviation of the fixation points when the patients observed copied and original figures, were frequently seen, when the patient was copying a geometrical figure.

Keywords

Peak Velocity Geometrical Figure Original Figure Verbal Direction Young Healthy Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Fujii
    • 1
  • S. Murakami
    • 1
  • S. Hayashi
    • 1
  • N. Nakano
    • 1
  • K. Utsumi
    • 1
  • R. Fukatsu
    • 1
  • N. Takahata
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neuropsychiatry School of MedicineSapporo Medical UniversitySapporo 060Japan

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