Specific Cleavage of β-Amyloid Precursor Protein by an Integral Membrane Metalloendopeptidase

  • Susan Boseman Roberts
  • Kim M. Ingalls
  • James A. Ripellino
  • Nikolaos K. Robakis
  • Kevin M. Felsenstein
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

The β-amyloid precursor protein (ß-APP) is a membrane spanning glycoprotein. The small ß-protein domain within the precursor is presumed to be the source of amyloid found in plaques characteristic of Alzheimer’s Disease. The amino terminus of ß-APP is released from cells by cleavages that produce both potentially amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic fragments of the carboxy terminus (Esch et al., 1990; Anderson et al., 1992; Seubert et al., 1993; Golde et al., 1992; Haas et al., 1992; Sisodia, 1992). Attenuating these cleavages could alter the amount of ß-protein produced by cells. To facilitate understanding the cellular processes that control ß-protein production, we have developed a system to identify the proteolytic enzymes involved. The system was used to characterize a cellular activity that cleaves at Lys16 within the ß-protein.

Keywords

Membrane Fraction Cell Free System Specific Cleavage Mercaptoacetic Acid Alzheimer Amyloid Protein Precursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Boseman Roberts
    • 1
  • Kim M. Ingalls
    • 1
  • James A. Ripellino
    • 2
  • Nikolaos K. Robakis
    • 2
  • Kevin M. Felsenstein
    • 1
  1. 1.CNS Drug DiscoveryDepartment of Biophysics and Molecular Biology Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research InstituteWallingfordUSA
  2. 2.Center for NeurobiologyDepartment of Psychiatry and Fishberg Research Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUK

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