Biomechanics of Flexor Pulley Reconstruction

  • Kai-Nan An
  • Gan-Tyan Lin
  • Peter C. Amadio
  • William P. CooneyIII
  • Edmund Y. S. Chao
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 256)

Abstract

Many surgical techniques have been described for pulley reconstruction to restore hand function.2,3,7,8 Biomechanically, a successfully reconstructed pulley should maintain adequate strength and similar compliance as those of the normal intact ligaments. In addition, it should provide the proper constraint of tendon to restore the functions of the digits. In this study, the efficacy of different types of pulley reconstruction on hand function were compared based on the joint motion and tendon excursion measurements. The mechanical properties of reconstructed pulleys were also tested to determine the strength and stiffness.

Keywords

Joint Motion Flexor Tendon Proximal Phalanx Pulley System Middle Phalange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai-Nan An
    • 1
  • Gan-Tyan Lin
    • 1
  • Peter C. Amadio
    • 1
  • William P. CooneyIII
    • 1
  • Edmund Y. S. Chao
    • 1
  1. 1.Orthopedic Biomechanics LaboratoryMayo Clinic/Mayo FoundationRochesterUSA

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