Neural Regulation of Allergy and Asthma. The Discoveries and Seminal Contributions of Andor Szentivanyi

  • Istvan Berczi
Part of the Hans Selye Symposia on Neuroendocrinology and Stress book series (HSSN, volume 3)

Abstract

The aspirations of natural sciences are to discover and understand the laws of Mother Nature with the final goal of diminishing human suffering and maintaining human activity in harmony with our environment. The presentation of facts pertinent to establishing natural laws is the overwhelming consideration in the literature of natural sciences and the human and social factors seldom get presented even though they play a major role in the evolution of science. I often wonder what it was like to state for the first time that the earth is not the center of the universe, or that God did not create man, but human beings are the result of a process of evolution from simple organisms to more complicated ones, or to uncover that diseases may be caused by invisible microorganisms, just to mention a few of the major advances in natural sciences. Perhaps one can rephrase this question. How many people recognized that the earth is moving but were afraid to say so either because they did not trust their own judgement or, perhaps, because they were afraid of punishment for heretic thinking. In the Middle Ages, heretic thinking was punishable by death so it took an extreme amount of courage on the part of Galilei to publicize his discovery. Why did he do it? One can only resort to guesses to outline his reasons. First of all, he must have been absolutely convinced that the evidence that he found was sufficient to prove his point. Second, he must have trusted his judgement and was not discouraged from publicizing his conclusion by the possibility that no one would agree with him.

Keywords

Cyclic Nucleotide Atopic Disease Bordetella Pertussis Cyclic Monophosphate Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    G. Filipp, A. Szentivanyi and B. Mess, Anaphylaxis and nervous system, Acta Med. Hung. Tomus III, Fasciculus 2:163 (1952).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. Szentivanyi and G. Filipp, Anaphylaxis and the nervous system. Part II, Ann. Allergy 16:143 (1958).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    G. Filipp and A. Szentivanyi, Anaphylaxis and the nervous system. Part III, Ann. Allergy 16:306 (1958).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szekely, Effect of injury to, and electrical stimulation of, hypothalamic areas on anaphylactic and histamine shock of the guinea pig. A preliminary report, Ann. Allergy 14:259 (1956).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szekely, Anaphylaxis and the nervous system. Part IV, Ann. Allergy 16:389 (1958).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    A. Szentivanyi, C.W. Fishel and D.W. Talmage, Adrenaline mediation of histamine and serotonin hyperglycemia in normal mice and the absence of adrenaline-induced hyperglycemia in pertussis-sensitized mice, J. Infect. Dis. 113:86 (1963).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    C.W. Fishel and A. Szentivanyi, The absence of adrenaline-induced hyperglycemia in pertussis-sensitized mice and its relation to histamine and serotonin hypersensitivity, J. Allergy 34:439 (1963).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    R.G. Townley, I.L. Trapani and A. Szentivanyi, Sensitization to anaphylaxis and to some of its pharmacological mediators by blockade of the beta adrenergic receptors, J. Allergy 39:177 (1967).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    A. Szentivanyi, The beta adrenergic theory of the atopic abnormality in bronchial asthma, J. Allergy 42:203 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. Katsh, D.G. Halkias and A. Szentivanyi, Analysis of the structural requirements for the histamine-sensitizing activity of the beta adrenergic blocking agents, J. Allergy 43:171 (1969).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    A. Szentivanyi, The conformational flexibility of adrenoceptors and the constitutional basis of atopy, Triangle 18:109 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    A. Szentivanyi, O. Heim and P. Schultze, Changes in adrenoceptor densities in membranes of lung tissue and lymphocytes from patients with atopic disease, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 332:295 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    A. Szentivanyi, P. Schultze, O. Heim, J. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Two different patterns of adrenoceptor mechanisms in drug versus disease-induced beta adrenergic subsensitivity in membranes of T and B lymphocytes, J. Reticuloendoth. Soc. 26:291 (1979).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    A. Szentivanyi, La flexibilite de conformation des adrenocepteurs et la base constitutionelle du terrain allergique, Rev. Franc. Allergol. 19:205 (1979).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    A. Szentivanyi, J. Szentivanyi and H. Wagner, Measurement of numbers of adrenoceptors in lymphocytes and lung tissue of patients with reversible obstructive airways disease, Clin. Pharmacol. Titer. 27:193 (1980).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    A. Szentivanyi, O. Heim, P. Schultze and J. Szentivanyi, Adrenoceptor binding studies with [3H] dihydroalprenolol with [H] dihydroergocryptine on membranes of lymphocytes from patients with atopic disease, Acta Dermato-Venerol. Suppl. 92:19 (1980).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    S. Asai, J.J. Krzanowski, D.F. Martin, R.F. Lockey, S.C. Bukantz and A. Szentivanyi, Ptychodiscus brevis toxin stimulates a new receptor site in activating parasympathetic nerve axonal voltage-sensitive sodium channels, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 69:10 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    A. Szentivanyi, Adrenergic receptors, Int. J. Immunoparmacol. 4:292 (1982).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szentivanyi, Altered adrenoceptor function in disease states, Pathobiol Anna. 12:340 (1982).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szentivanyi, Some selected aspects of the immunopharmacology of adrenoceptors, Adv. Immunopharmacol. 2:269 (1983).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    J.B. Poison, R.F. Lockey, S.C. Bukantz, S. Lowitt, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Effects of ketotifen on the responsiveness of human peripheral blood lymphocyte beta adrenergic receptors, The Pharmacologist 29:132 (1987).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    J.B. Poison, R.F. Lockey, S.C. Bukantz, S. Lowitt, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Responsiveness of lymphocyte beta adrenergic receptors in patients treated with ketotifen, Clin. Pharmacol. Tlierap. 43:137 (1988).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    J.B. Poison, R.F. Lockey, S.C. Bukantz, S. Lowitt, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Effects of ketotifen on the responsiveness of peripheral blood lymphocyte beta adrenergic receptors, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 10:657 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    J.J. Krzanowski, M.E. Schwartz, S. Reiner, O. Heim, C. Abarca and A. Szentivanyi, Adrenergic influences on the induction of histidine decarboxylase synthesis in hematopoietic progenitor cells, J. Leukocyte Biol. 46:294 (1989).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    A. Szentivanyi, M.E. Schwartz, O. Heim, G. Filipp and C. Abarca, Ketotifen treatment restores the beta adrenergic modulation of the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) induced respiratory burst in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in asthma, J. Clin. Pharmacol. 29:859 (1989).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    A. Szentivanyi, M.E. Schwartz, S. Reiner, O. Heim, C. Abarca, S. Robicsek and J.J. Krzanowski, Requirements for central and peripheral adrenergic input in the induction of histidine decarboxylase synthesis by interleukin 3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in hematopoietic progenitor cells, Cytokine 1:133 (1989).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    A. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, M.E. Schwartz, O. Heim, J. Szentivanyi and S. Robicsek, Restoration of normal beta adrenoceptor concentrations in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells by leukocyte protein factors and recombinant interleukin-1a (IL-1a), Cytokine 1:118 (1989).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    G. Kunkel, R. Paus, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Beta-adrenergic receptors in nasal tissue with reference to their role in asthma and atopy, Allergol Immunopathol 17:67 (1989).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    A. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, O. Heim, S. Robicsek and J.F. Hackney, Studies on the nature of the lymphocytic protein factors upregulating beta-adrenergic receptors, Clin. Pharmacol. Therap. 149:139 (1991).Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    A. Szentivanyi, P. Schultze, O. Heim, S. Reiner, S. Robicsek, J. Zority, K.J. Hurt, J.F. Hackney, E.G. Calderón, J.J. Dwornik and R.F. Lockey, The elution profile of the A549 beta adrenergic (bAR) regulating activity of lymphocyte conditioned medium (LCM) of IM9 cells developed by DEAE ion exchange HPLC, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 13:68 (1991).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    A. Szentivanyi, E.G. Calderón, O. Heim, P. Schultze, H. Wagner, J. Zority, R.F. Lockey, J.J. Dwornik and S. Robicsek, Adrenergic and histamine receptor concentrations in bone marrow cells, Int. J. Immunopharmacol 13:740 (1991).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    A. Szentivanyi, O. Heim, P. Schultze, H. Wagner, J. Zority, E. Calderón, J.J. Dwornik and R.F. Lockey, Sensitization of bone marrow hemopoietic progenitor cells to the interleukin-3 (IL-3) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced de novo synthesis of histidine decarboxylase through the activation of beta adrenoceptors, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 13:73 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    J. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, O. Heim, J.F. Hackney, S. Robicsek, R.F. Lockey, J.J. Dwornik and A. Szentivanyi, Impaired capacity of lymphocyte proteins to upregulate beta-adrenoceptors in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells in respiratory and cutaneous atopic disease, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 13:743 (1991).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    E.G. Calderón, O. Heim, A. Szentivanyi, P. Schultze, H. Wagner, J. Zority, R.F. Lockey, J.J. Dwornik and S. Robicsek, Adrenergic and histamine receptor concentrations in bone marow cells, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 89:277 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    R.A. Ortez, T.W. Klein and A. Szentivanyi, Impairment of the adenyl cyclase system in spleens of mice sensitized bacterially or by beta pharmacological blockade, J. Allergy 45:111 (1970).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    R.A. Ortez, T.W. Klein and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic AMP levels in spleens of pertussis-sensitized mice, Fed. Proc. 29:640 (1970).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Histamine, isoproterenol, and epinephrine induced in vivo activation of adenyl cyclase in mouse lung following Bordetella pertussis, The Pharmacologist 16:212 (1974).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Effects of methacholine, histamine, and atropine on pulmonary guanosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate in hypersensitive mice, The Pharmacologist 16:212 (1974).Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Histamine-induced changes in pulmonary guanosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate and adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate levels in mice following sensitization by Bordetella pertussis and/or propranolol, Res. Commun. Chem. Pathol. Pharmacol. 9:243 (1974).Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Elevation of pulmonary cyclic GMP levels caused by histamine and methacholine in mice simulating atopic disease, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 5:815 (1974).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, In vivo alterations in adenosine-3′,5,-cyclic monophosphate levels following adrenergic activation in animal models of atopic disease, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 5:819 (1975).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Pulmonary patterns of adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulations in response to adrenergic or histamine stimulation in Bordetella pertussis-sensitized mice, Biochem. Pharmacol. 25:1631 (1976).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Pulmonary guanosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate in sensitized mice: Accumulations produced by H-l receptor activation and evidence of altered phosphodiesterase activity, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 57:265 (1976).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    JJ. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Reduction in levels of pulmonary cyclic guanosine-3′,5′,-monophosphate induced by theophylline and isoproterenol, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 57:265 (1976).Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    D.F. Fitzpatrick and A. Szentivanyi, The effects of protein kinase and cyclic nucleotides on calcium (Ca2+) uptake by rabbit aortic microsomes, The Pharmacologist 18:182 (1976).Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel, J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Lung cyclic nucleotides in bronchospastic and nonreversible obstructive lung disease, Am. Rev. Resp. Dis. 115:330 (1977).Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Pulmonary cyclic nucleotide lowering after ganglionic blockade and prostaglandin synthetase inhibition, The Pharmacologist 19:204 (1977).Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    D.F. Fitzpatrick and A. Szentivanyi, Stimulation of calcium uptake into aortic microsomes by cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, Naun. Schmied. Arch. Pharmacol. 298:255 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison, A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic nucleotide levels in human lung from patients with bronchospastic airway disease, The Pharmacologist 19:203 (1977).Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, D.F. Fitzpatrick and A. Szentivanyi, Studies on the inhibition of phosphodiesterase-catalyzed cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP breakdown and relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Biochem. Pharmacol. 27:254 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in patients with reversible and nonreversible airway obstruction, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 9:757 (1978).Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison, A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic nucleotide levels in human lung from patients with bronchospastic airway disease, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 9:767 (1978).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison, A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel and A. Szentivanyi, Reduced adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate levels in patients with reversible obstructive airways disease, Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol. 6:111 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Divergent effects of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors on pulmonary cyclic 3′,5′,-adenosine monophosphate and cyclic 3′,5′-guanosine monophosphate levels in untreated and histamine-sensitized mice, Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn. 241:324 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    J.J. Krzanowski, A. Urdaneta-Bohorquez, J.B. Poison, Y. Sakamoto and A. Szentivanyi, Studies of two smooth muscle relaxants (adenosine and theophylline) both capable of influencing tissue cyclic AMP levels on canine tracheal smooth muscle, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 17A:49 (1984).Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    R.A. Duncan, J.J. Krzanowski, J.S. Davis, J.B. Poison, R.G. Coffey, T. Shimoda and A. Szentivanyi, Polyphosphoinositide metabolism in canine tracheal smooth muscle in response to a cholinergic stimulus, Biochem. Pharmacol. 36:307 (1987).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. 57.
    R. Duncan, J.J. Krzanowski, J. Poison, J.B. Coffey, T. Shimoda and A. Szentivanyi, The kinetics of the acetylcholine induced inositol phosphate formation in isolated contracting canine tracheal smooth muscle, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 79:196 (1987).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    J.J. Krzanowski, A. Urdaneta-Bohorquez, J.B. Poison, Y. Sakamoto and A. Szentivanyi, Effects of adenosine and theophylline on canine tracheal smooth muscle tone, Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn. Ther. 287:224 (1987).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    R.A. Duncan, J.J. Krzanowski, J. Davis, R.G. Coffey, J.B. Poison, T. Watanabe and A. Szentivanyi, The dose-response relationship between inositol phosphate formation and contractile resposnes in canine tracheal smooth muscle, The Pharmacologist 29:117 (1987).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Theophylline attenuation of histamine-induced increases in pulmonary adenosine-3′,5′,-cyclic monohosphate, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 55:133 (1975).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Theophylline, theobromine and caffeine inhibition of cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis by respiratory smooth muscle phosphodiesterase, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 55:133 (1975).Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Theophylline, theobromine, caffeine, and ICI 58,301 inhibition of adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic phosphate and guanosine-3′,5′-cyclic phosphate hydrolysis by canine tracheal smooth muscle phosphodiesterase, Fed. Proc. 34:261 (1975).Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and D.B. Tyler, Reduction of the histamine-induced increase in pulmonary adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate levels by theophylline, Fed. Proc. 34:332 (1975).Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    D.F. Fitzpatrick, J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Correlation of tracheal smooth muscle relaxation with phosphodiesterase inhibition, Vie Pharmacologist 17:271 (1975).Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    J.F. Williams, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Investigation of the pharmacological activity of the matabolites of the methylxanthines, The Pharmacologist 18:181 (1976).Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, A.L. Goldman, T.A. Ebel and A. Szentivanyi, inhibition of human pulmonary phosphodiesterase by therapeutic levels of theophylline, The Pharmacologist 19:203 (1977).Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    J.F. Williams, S. Lowitt, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Pharmacological and biochemical activities of some monomethylxanthine and methyluric acid derivatives of theophylline and caffeine, Biochem. Pharmacol. 27:1545 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, A.L. Goldman and A. Szentivanyi, Inhibition of human pulmonary phosphodiesterase activity by therapeutic levels of theophylline, Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol. 5:553 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. 69.
    J.P. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, W.H. Anderson, D.F. Fitzpatrick, D.P.C. Hwang and A. Szentivanyi, Analysis of the relationship between pharmacological inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Biochem. Pharmacol. 28:1391 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Stimulation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity by the heated supernatant fraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Allergol. Immunopathol. 7:297 (1979).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Separation of the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Fed. Proc. 40:665 (1981).Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, A.L. Goldman and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in patients with obstructive airways disease, Allergol. Immunopathol. 10:101 (1982).Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Inhibition of a high affinity cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Biochem. Pharmacol 31:3403 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison, M. McPherson, A. Urdaneta-Bohorquez and A. Szentivanyi, Adenosine-theophylline interactions in canine tracheal smooth muscle strips, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 71:131 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. 75.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases partially purified from canine tracheal smooth muscle, Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 17A:41 (1984).Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Correlation between inhibition of a cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase and relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle, Biochem. Pharmacol. 34:1875 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    S. Robicsek, J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, R.F. Lockey and A. Szentivanyi, Study of human lymphocyte phosphodiesterase using high pressure liquid chromatography, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 79:168 (1987).Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    S. Robicsek, J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, R.F. Lockey and A. Szentivanyi, High pressure liquid chromatography of human T-lymphocyte phosphodiesterases, Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 43:167 (1988).Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    S. Robicsek, J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski, R.F. Lockey and A. Szentivanyi, Separation of lymphocyte cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases by ion exchange high pressure liquid chromatography, Adv. Sec. Mess. Phosphopro. Res. 21A:24 (1988).Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    S. Robecsek, J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Analysis of human T-lymphocyte cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity by high pressure liquid chromatography and type III inhibitors, FASEB J. 3:1295 (1989).Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    J.B. Poison, SA. Robicsek, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Paritculate cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in human T-lymphocytes, Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 47:169 (1990).Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    S. Robicsek, D.K. Blanchard, J. Djeu, J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Attenuation of human T-lymphocyte blastogenesis by the selective inhibition of cAMP-phosphodiesterases, FASEB J. 4:A337 (1990).Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    S. Robicsek, D.K. Blanchard, J. Djeu, J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Synergistic effect on T-lymphocyte blastogenesis by selective cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, FASEB J. 4:2036 (1990).Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    S.A. Robicsek, D.K. Blanchard, J.Y. Djeu, J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Multiple high affinity cAMP-phosphodiesterases regulate proliferation in human thymic lymphocytes, Biochem. Pharmacol. 42:869 (1991).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 85.
    S. Robicsek, D.K. Blanchard, J. Djeu, J.J. Krzanowski, A. Szentivanyi and J.B. Poison, Attenuation of IL-2 and Tac receptor expression by selective PDE inhibitors in human T-lymphocytes, Int. J. Immunophartnacol. 13:734 (1991).Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    R.A. Ortez, C.W. Fishel and A. Szentivanyi, The reduced sensitivity of Bordetella pertussis vaccinated murine spleen and platelet adenyl cyclase to epinephrine, Fed. Proc. 31:748 (1972).Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    C.W. Fishel, A. Szentivanyi and T.W. Klein, Effect of epinephrine on plasma cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels of Bordetella pertussis-vaccinated and of adrenergically blocked mice, Fed. Proc. 32:1009 (1973).Google Scholar
  88. 88.
    J.B. Poison, J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Effect of histamine on the pulmonary levels of cyclic nucleotides in normal mice and under conditions of pharmacologic or bacterial sensitization, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 53:100 (1974).Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Energy mtabolism and patterns of behavior of adenosine-3′,5′,-cyclic monophosphate in lung from control and bacterially sensitized mice under conditions of rest and adrenergic activation, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 53:100 (1974).Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    T.W. Klein, A. Szentivanyi and C.W. Fishel, Effects of serotonin on platelets of normal and Bordetella pertussis-injected mice, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol Med. 147:681 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    R.A. Ortez, D. Seshachalam and A. Szentivanyi, Alterations in adenyl cyclase activity and glucose utilization of Bordetella pertussis sensitized mouse spleen, Biochem. Pharmacol. 24:1297 (1975).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Effect of Bordetella pertussis vaccine on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of mouse liver, Fed. Proc. 34:261 (1975).Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    C.W. Fishel, D.G. Halkias, T.W. Klein and A. Szentivanyi, Characteristics of cells present in peritoneal fluids of mice injected intraperitoneally with Bordetella pertussis, Infect. Immun. 13:263 (1976).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. 94.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Depression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme activity by Bordetella pertussis vaccination, Eur. J. Pharmacol. 43:281 (1977).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. 95.
    J.F. Williams, S. Lowitt and A. Szentivanyi, Effect of endotoxin and phenobarbital on heme enzymes of rat liver, The Pharmacologist 21:232 (1979).Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    J.F. Williams, S. Lowitt and A. Szentivanyi, Involvement of a heat-stable and heat-1abile component of Bordetella pertussis in the depression of murine hepatic mixed-function oxidase system, Biochem. Pharmacol. 29:1483 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. 97.
    J.F. Williams, S. Lowitt and Z. Szentivanyi, Endotoxin depression of hepatic mixed function oxidase system in C3H/Hej and C3H/H3N mice, Immunopharmocology 2:285 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    J.F. Williams, A.L. Winters, S. Lowitt and A. Szentivanyi, Depression of hepatic mixed-function oxidase activity by Bordetella pertussis in splenectomized and athymic nude mice, Immunopharmacology 3:101 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. 99.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szentivanyi, Neuester Stand der Rezeptoren-Theorie bei Atopie, Allergologie 6:155 (1983).Google Scholar
  100. 100.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Continued studies on the effect of interferon inducers on the hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase system of rats and mice, J. Interferon Res. 3:211 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. 101.
    H. Friedman and A. Szentivanyi, Microbial vaccines — specific and non-specific modifiers of immunity, Immunol. Allergy Prac. 7:40/17 (1985).Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Effect of carbon tetrachloride on hepatic cytochrome P-450 activity in endotoxin tolerant and polymixin B treated rats, The Pharmacologist 27:251 (1985).Google Scholar
  103. 103.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Induction of tolerance in mice and rats to the effect of endotoxin to decrease the hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase system. Evidence for a possible macropahge-derived factor in endotoxin effect, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 7:501 (1985).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. 104.
    H. Friedman and A. Szentivanyi, Antibacterial immunity, vaccines, and allergy, Allergologie 8:357 (1985).Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    H. Friedman, T. Klein, A. Szentivanyi and A. Nowotny, Immunomodulation by bacterial products: Role of intermediary soluble factors, Int. J. Immunother. 2:6164 (1986).Google Scholar
  106. 106.
    A. Nowotny, K. Blanchard, C. Newton, T.W. Klein, W. Stewart II, A. Szentivanyi and H. Friedman, Interferon induction by endotoxin-derived nontoxic polysaccharides, J. Interferon Res. 7:371 (1987).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. 107.
    A. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, O. Heim, G. Filipp and C. Abarca, The effect of sympathetic ablation [6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA); axotomy] on endotoxin induced adrenergic mechanisms, The Pharmacologist 31:118 (1989).Google Scholar
  108. 108.
    A. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, O. Heim, G. Filipp and C. Abarca, In vivo and in vitro studies on adrenergic mechanisms induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin, J. Leukocyte Biol. 46:328 (1989).Google Scholar
  109. 109.
    A. Szentivanyi, J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and C.M. Abarca, The pharmacology of microbial modulation in the induction and expression of immune reactivities. I. The pharmacologically active effector molecules of immunologic inflammation, immunity, and hypersensitivity, Immunopharmacol Rev. 1:159 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. 110.
    J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Implications of hepatic drug metabolizing activity in the therapy of bronchial asthma, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 55:125 (1975).Google Scholar
  111. 111.
    S. Lowitt, J.F. Williams and A. Szentivanyi, Dexamethasone induction to tryptophan oxygenase activity in vivo and in isolated rat hepatic parenchymal cells: Effect of bacterial endotoxin, The Pharmacologist 20:157 (1978).Google Scholar
  112. 112.
    A. Szentivanyi and E. Middleton Jr., Asthma pharmacotherapy and why, J. Respirat. Therap. 1:10 (1980).Google Scholar
  113. 113.
    J.F. Hackney and A. Szentivanyi, Response of isolated guinea pig tracheal muscle to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid succinates, Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn. Therap. 244:4 (1980).Google Scholar
  114. 114.
    L. Kirkman, A. Goldman, J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison, W. Anderson, A. Richman and A. Szentivanyi, Enhanced in vitro sensitivity to propranolol-induced beta adrenergic blockade in COPD patients, Am. Rev. Resp. Dis. 123:79 (1981).Google Scholar
  115. 115.
    J.J. Krzanowski and A. Szentivanyi, Invited editorial: Reflections on some aspects of current research in asthma, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 72:433 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. 116.
    Y. Sakamoto, J.J. Krzanowski, R.F. Lockey, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, The potential of ergonovine to precipitate bronchial asthmatic attacks via serotonin receptors, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 73:129 (1984).Google Scholar
  117. 117.
    S. Robicsek, J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and A. Szentivanyi, Réévaluation of theophylline for asthma? J. Clin. Pharmacol. 29:859 (1989).Google Scholar
  118. 118.
    A. Szentivanyi, M.E. Schwartz, O. Heim and G. Filipp, Ketotifen and the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) induced respiratory burst in asthma, Clin. Pharmacol. Therap. 47:137 (1990).Google Scholar
  119. 119.
    A. Szentivanyi, M.E. Schwartz, O. Heim, G. Filipp and C. Abarca, Ketotifen and the n-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) induced respiratory burst in asthma, J. Clin. Pharmacol. 30:92 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. 120.
    A. Szentivanyi, S. Reiner, O. Heim, C. Abarca, J. Szentivanyi, S. Robiecsek and J. Hackney, Impaired lymphokine regulation of b-adrenoceptors in asthma and atopic dermatitis, J. Leukocyte Biol. Suppl.1:183 (1990).Google Scholar
  121. 121.
    J. Szentivanyi, O. Heim, P. Schultze, H. Wagner, E.G. Calderón, R.F. Lockey, S. Robicsek and A. Szentivanyi, Similarities and differences in patterns of beta-adrenergic regulation by lymphocytic proteins in respiratory and cutaneous atopy versus cystic fibrosis, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 89:162 (1992).Google Scholar
  122. 122.
    A. Szentivanyi and D. F. Fitzpatrick, The altered reactivity of the effector cells to antigenic and pharmacological influences and its relation to cyclic nucleotides. II. Effector reactivities in the efferent loop of the immune response, in: “Pathomechanismmus und Pathogenese Allergischer Reaktionen,” G. Filipp, ed., Werk-Verlag Dr. Edmund Banachewski, Grafelfing bei München (1980).Google Scholar
  123. 123.
    A. Szentivanyi, J. B. Poison and J. J. Krzanowski, The altered reactivity of the effector cells to antigenic and pharmacological influences and its relation to cyclic nucleotides. I. Effector reactivities in the efferent loop of the immune response, in: “Pathomechanismus und Pathogenese Allergischer Reaktionen,” G. Filipp, ed., Werk-Verlag, Dr. Edmund Banachewski, Grafelfing bei München (1980).Google Scholar
  124. 124.
    A. Szentivanyi, J.J. Krzanowski, J.B. Poison and W. H. Anderson, Evolution of research strategy in the experimental analysis of the beta adrenergic approach to the constitutional basis of atopy, in: “Advances in Allergology and Clinical Immunology,” A. Oehling, E. Mathov, I. Glazer and C. Arbesman, eds., Pergamon Press, Oxford (1980).Google Scholar
  125. 125.
    A. Szentivanyi, Effect of bacterial products and adrenergic blocking agents on allergic reactions, in: “Textbook of Immunological Diseases,” M. Samter, D.W. Talmage, B. Rose, W.B. Sherman and J.H. Vaughan, eds., Little, Brown and Co., Boston, MA (1971).Google Scholar
  126. 126.
    A. Szentivanyi, J. J. Krzanowski and J. B. Poison, The autonomic nervous system: Structure, function, and altered effector responses, in: “Allergy: Principles and Practice,” E. Middleton, C. E. Reed and E. F. Ellis, eds., C.V. Mosby Co., St. Louis, MO (1978).Google Scholar
  127. 127.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. F. Williams, The constitutional basis of atopic disease, in: “Allergic Diseases of Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence,” C. W. Bierman and D. S. Pearlman, eds., W.B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, PA (1980).Google Scholar
  128. 128.
    A. Szentivanyi, Adrenergic and cholinergic receptor studies in human lung and lymphocytic membranes and their relation to bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma, in: “Patient Care Publications,” Darien, CT (1982).Google Scholar
  129. 129.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szentivanyi, Anti-allergic drugs and beta adrenoceptors, in: “Proceedings of the Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology,” Clermont-Ferrand, France (1982).Google Scholar
  130. 130.
    J.F. Hackney and A. Szentivanyi, The specificity of glucocorticoids in the relaxation of respiratory smooth muscle in vitro, J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 55:123 (1975).Google Scholar
  131. 131.
    J.F. Hackney and A. Szentivanyi, The unique action of glucocorticoid succinates on respiratory smooth muscle in vitro, The Pharmacologist 17:271 (1975).Google Scholar
  132. 132.
    S. Lowitt, A. Szentivanyi and J.F. Williams, Endotoxin inhibition of dexamethasone induction of tryptophan oxygenase in suspension culture of isolated rat parenchymal cells. II. Effect of in vivo pretreatment of rats with endotoxin, Biochem. Pharmacol. 31:693 (1982).Google Scholar
  133. 133.
    A. Szentivanyi and J. Szentivanyi, Mechanisms of action of corticosteroids, in: “Proceedings of the International Symposium on Allergy and Immunoloty,” Lima, Peru (1985).Google Scholar
  134. 134.
    A. Szentivanyi, The immune-neuroendocrine circuitry~The next, and possibly, the last frontier of vertebrate immunity, in: I. Berczi and J. Szelenyi, eds., “Advances in Psychoneuroimmunology,” Plenum Press (1994).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Istvan Berczi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

Personalised recommendations