The Psychopathy Checklist—Revised (PCL-R)

An Overview for Researchers and Clinicians
  • Stephen D. Hart
  • Robert D. Hare
  • Timothy J. Harpur
Part of the Advances in Psychological Assessment book series (AIPA, volume 8)

Abstract

The Psychopathy Checklist (PCL; Hare, 1980) and its revision (PCL-R; Hare, 1985a, in press) are clinical rating scales that provide researchers and clinicians with reliable and valid assessments of psychopathy. Their development was spurred largely by dissatisfactions with the ways in which other assessment procedures defined and measured psychopathy (Hare, 1980, 1985b).

Keywords

Personality Disorder Antisocial Personality Disorder Prison Inmate Violent Recidivism Forensic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen D. Hart
    • 1
  • Robert D. Hare
    • 2
  • Timothy J. Harpur
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of IllinoisChampaignUSA

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