Morphometric Spaces, Shape Components and the Effects of Linear Transformations

  • F. James Rohlf
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 284)

Abstract

The various types of mathematical spaces used in morphometrics are reviewed with emphasis given to the distinctions between the physical space of the organism, shape space and tangent spaces. The effects of linear transformations of the coordinates of the landmarks (on the specimens or the reference) on various statistical analyses and estimates of the uniform and nonaffine components of shape variation are presented. It is shown why statistical analyses of the estimates of the nonaffine components of shape variation are sensitive to affine transformations of the reference or the specimens (which may seem counterintuitive). Some implications of these results on the choices of methods for the study of shape are discussed.

Keywords

Tangent Space Shape Space Procrustes Analysis Procrustes Distance Partial Warp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. James Rohlf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and EvolutionState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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