Human Ventilatory Response to Immersion of the Face in Cool Water

  • Lauren M. Stewart
  • Abraham Guz
  • Piers C. G. Nye
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 450)

Abstract

The cardiovascular response to facial cooling in man can be dramatic (3), and this is shown by one exceptional subject studied by us (Figure 1). Here there was an increase in cardiac interval from one second during the control period to seven seconds as the cool water reached the eyes. This response is very pronounced in diving animals (1) and is therefore commonly known as the diving reflex. The bradycardia is accompanied by vasoconstriction which diverts blood flow away from the robust periphery towards the hypoxically sensitive heart and brain. The reflex is most prominent during breath-holding, indeed it may be completely overridden by the act of breathing. An abstract of this work has been published (4).

Keywords

Cool Water Trigeminal Nerve Ventilatory Response Ventilatory Effect Cardiac Interval 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Daly, M. DeB. Breath-hold diving: mechanisms of cardiovascular adjustments in the mammal. In Recent advances in Physiology 10 ed. P.F. Baker: 201–245, 1984.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hensel, H., and A. Iggo. Analysis of cutaneous warm and cold fibres in primates. Pflugers Arch. 329: 1–8, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kawakami, Y., B.H. Natelson, and A.B. Dubois. Cardiovascular effects of face immersion and factors affecting diving reflex in man. J Appl Physiol. 23: 964–970, 1967.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Stewart, I.M., A. Guz, and P.C.G. Nye. Stimulation of human ventilation by face immersion in cold water. J Physiol. 501: 58P, 1997.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Truex, R.C., and M.B. Carpenter. Strong and Elwyn’s Human Neuroanatomy (5th ed.). Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore, 1964.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren M. Stewart
    • 1
  • Abraham Guz
    • 1
  • Piers C. G. Nye
    • 1
  1. 1.University Laboratory of PhysiologyOxfordUK

Personalised recommendations