Fracture Toughness of Partially Welded Joints of SUS316 in High Magnetic Field at 4K

  • A. Nishimura
  • J. Yamamoto
  • O. Motojima
  • J. W. Chan
  • J. W. MorrisJr.
  • R. L. Tobler
  • H. Takahashi
  • S. Suzuki
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

Two kinds of partially welded austenitic stainless steel joints were prepared using SUS 316, 75 mm thick. One joint was fabricated using tungsten inert gas welding and metal arc gas welding, and the other was electron beam welded. Compact tension specimens for fracture toughness tests were machined out from these welded plates in the thickness direction. The fracture toughness tests of these specimens with natural cracks were carried out in 0, 8, and 14 T fields at 4 K.

The test results show that there is no strong effect of the high magnetic field on the fracture toughness of these joints, and the electron beam welded joints give a very low toughness in any case because of the complicated natural crack front shape.

Keywords

Fracture Toughness Crack Front Crack Opening Displacement Crack Extension High Magnetic Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Nishimura
    • 1
  • J. Yamamoto
    • 1
  • O. Motojima
    • 1
  • J. W. Chan
    • 2
  • J. W. MorrisJr.
    • 2
  • R. L. Tobler
    • 3
  • H. Takahashi
    • 4
  • S. Suzuki
    • 4
  1. 1.National Institute for Fusion ScienceToki, GifuJapan
  2. 2.Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA
  4. 4.Hitachi Works, Hitachi, LtdHitachi, IbarakiJapan

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