Magnetosensitive Conductivity of Aluminum and the Advantage of Corbino Geometry

  • B. B. Boiko
  • V. R. Sobol
  • O. N. Mazurenko
  • A. A. Drozd
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

The problem of low temperature high density charge transport in disk shaped sample (Corbino geometry) has been investigated experimentally and analytically for polycrystalline aluminum having residual resistance ratio of 104. The values of magnetoresistance and self magnetic field stimulated by Hall drift in an external magnetic field up to 8 T has been estimated for exciting current of the order 103 A flowing through the disk samples. The analysis of observed data has been done on the base of equations for connection of current density with electric and magnetic field, the relaxation processes having been taken into account. Definite correlations between experiment and theory for disk shaped sample being inductance were established. These are: magnetoresistance, self magnetic field, its distribution and energy, characteristic transition time. Some possible variants of application of studied phenomena for energy storage and transmission, control systems of cryogenic electric circuits are proposed with account of characteristic inductive and resistive properties of sample organized in such manner.

Keywords

Magnetic Field External Magnetic Field Average Energy Density Disk Shaped Sample Inductive Energy Storage 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. B. Boiko
    • 1
  • V. R. Sobol
    • 1
  • O. N. Mazurenko
    • 1
  • A. A. Drozd
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Physics of Solids and SemiconductorsMinskBelarus

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