Nonequilibrium Segregation and Fracture Mechanism of High-Manganese Cryogenic Steels

  • K. S. Xue
  • D. Y. Sun
  • Z. R. Xu
  • B. Wang
  • J. Li
  • J. Q. Shen
  • W. Wang
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

Nonequilibrium segregation of manganese at grain boundaries of high-manganese austenitic steels, which was reported previously, was verified by AES and TEM—EDS analysis in this study. The deformation behavior of high-manganese steels with different manganese content was characterized, and the low-temperature toughness for various heat-treatment conditions was determined. On the basis of these data, the fracture mechanisms are discussed. The “hard-shell” model of low-temperature fracture of high-manganese steels, which was proposed by Xue in the earlier paper, was validated by the ultra-microhardness test.

Keywords

Austenitic Steel Intergranular Fracture Manganese Content Segregation Zone Intergranular Fracture Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. S. Xue
    • 1
  • D. Y. Sun
    • 2
  • Z. R. Xu
    • 3
  • B. Wang
    • 1
  • J. Li
    • 1
  • J. Q. Shen
    • 1
  • W. Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Shanghai Research Institute of MaterialsShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Research Institute of Machinery Science and TechnologyBeijingChina
  3. 3.Shanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina

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