Description and Performance of a Near-Room Temperature Magnetic Refrigerator

  • C. Zimm
  • A. Jastrab
  • A. Sternberg
  • V. Pecharsky
  • K. GschneidnerJr.
  • M. Osborne
  • I. Anderson
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

Magnetic refrigeration has been viewed as primarily a cryogenic technology because the necessary high magnetic fields are most easily provided by superconducting magnets. However, some of the largest magnetocaloric effects are exhibited by gadolinium-based alloys near room temperature. Ames Laboratory and Astronautics Corporation of America have been collaborating to apply such materials to large-scale commercial and industrial cooling near room temperature. Astronautics has designed and operated a reciprocating magnetic refrigerator that uses water as a heat transfer fluid. The device uses the active magnetic regeneration concept of recent cryogenic devices, but in contrast to the cryogenic case, the heat capacity of the fluid in the pores of the regenerator bed is comparable to that of the solid matrix. Using a 5 T field, the refrigerator reliably produces cooling powers exceeding 500 watts at coefficients of performance of 6 or more. This record performance puts magnetic refrigeration in a class with the best of current technology, vapor cycle refrigeration, without having to use volatile, environmentally hazardous fluids.

Keywords

Magnetocaloric Effect Heat Transfer Fluid Cooling Power Gear Pump Magnetic Refrigeration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Zimm
    • 1
  • A. Jastrab
    • 1
  • A. Sternberg
    • 1
  • V. Pecharsky
    • 2
  • K. GschneidnerJr.
    • 2
  • M. Osborne
    • 2
  • I. Anderson
    • 2
  1. 1.Astronautics Technology CenterMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Ames LaboratoryIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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