Motivation, Evaluation, and Educational Testing Policy

  • Kennedy T. Hill

Abstract

Mark is a 4th grade student in the Jefferson Elementary School in a middle-size American community. His school is integrated and due to changing neighborhood residential patterns has a good mix of children from various socioeconomic backgrounds. The Jefferson Elementary School student population in many ways mirrors the larger community.

Keywords

Time Pressure Social Comparison Anxious Child Achievement Test Test Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kennedy T. Hill
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Child Behavior and DevelopmentUniversity of IllinoisUrbana-ChampaignUSA

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