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The Influence of Psychotherapeutic Practices on a Hermeneutics of Discourse

  • Angelina Baydala
Chapter

Summary

In laying out principles and practices of psychoanalysis and narrative therapy, this paper clarifies distinct forms of therapy as hermeneutics of discourse. The development of psychoanalytic practice is traced from authoritarian to dialogical access of deep experience. Meaning advances recursively as it is both unmasked and restored. Narrative therapy, by contrast, challenges subjugated, oppressive discourses. Its practices emphasize the generation of new meaning, mutually constructed by therapist and client. Although hermeneutics leaves discourse continually open to re-interpretation, understanding is not held to be constructed, but rather shared in relations of desire. A hermeneutics of discourse highlights psychotherapy as a forum for understanding, emphasizing how it is that the persons involved in therapy specify both the possibility and the limits of understanding. Understanding is radically contextual, dependent not only on the practices of therapy, but on the persons involved in interpreting those practices. The limits involved in shared meaning create the conditions which make understanding possible.

Keywords

Original Work Shared Meaning Therapeutic Practice Standard Edition Narrative Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelina Baydala
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CalgaryCanada

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