Aspects of the Reproductive Biology of Japanese Anurans

  • Toshijiro Kawamura
  • Midori Nishioka

Abstract

Seventeen anurans occur on the four main islands of Japan and on the Islands of Tsushima situated between Japan and Korea. Two of these, Rana nigromaculata and R. brevipoda, are pond frogs allied to Rana esculenta.1 Six other species, Rana japonica, R. ornativentris, R. tagoi, R. chensinensis, R. tsushimensis and R. dyboswkii, are brown frogs allied to Rana temporaria, although Rana tagoi differs from the others in many respects. In addition to these species, two small, dark-colored frogs, Rana rugosa and R. limnocharis, and a large American frog, Rana catesbeiana, are widely distributed in Japan. In other genera Hyla arborea japonica, Bufo bufo japonicus, Bufo torrenticola and three species of Rhacophorus occur. Although it is generally believed that Bombina orientalis occurs on Tsushima, no one has recently found it there. During the last ten years, we have made a number of studies of reproductive biology using most of the Japanese anurans and some foreign ones.

Keywords

Experimental Series Reciprocal Hybrid Testosterone Propionate Brown Frog Hybrid Inviability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshijiro Kawamura
    • 1
  • Midori Nishioka
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Amphibian Biology, Faculty of ScienceHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan

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