Physiological Optics

  • Peter F. Sharp
  • Russell Philips

Abstract

The earliest theories about the visual system regarded the eye not as receiving signals but rather as an emitter of “psychic stuff;” vision was a process of feeling the scene. This led the early anatomists to regard the optic nerve as a hollow tube through which this “stuff” was transmitted.

Keywords

Ganglion Cell Receptive Field Lateral Geniculate Nucleus Amacrine Cell Spherical Aberration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter F. Sharp
  • Russell Philips

There are no affiliations available

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