Selenium in diets

  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

The enormous growth in interest in the role of selenium in health that followed the discovery of its relationship to prevention of liver necrosis in rats by Schwartz and Foltz in 19571 and, even more so, the 1980 reports of Robinson’s group in New Zealand2 and Chen and his colleagues in China,3 which drew attention to the connection between selenium deficiency and human disease, helped focus attention in recent years on the dearth of knowledge about dietary intakes of the element in most countries of the world. Health authorities, who must consider the public health implications of possible wide-scale nutritional deficiencies, began to recognise the need for reliable data on regional and national levels of selenium intake. However, in spite of the enthusiasm with which many investigators responded to this need for information, a good deal of what was published appeared to be contradictory and of doubtful reliability. Even when studies were performed by competent analysts, reported intakes often applied only to restricted regions or to limited population groups. Indeed, until relatively recently, except for a few notable exceptions such as the 1976 UK study of Thorn and her colleagues,4 the determination of dietary intakes of selenium on a national level has proved to be beyond the economic and technical abilities of many countries. That situation is now rapidly being improved,5 although problems still remain.

Keywords

International Atomic Energy Agency GSHPx Activity Selenium Level Selenium Deficiency Selenium Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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