Selenium in health and disease III

Non-endemic selenium-responsive conditions
  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

Both KD and KBD are endemic diseases that occur in reasonably well defined geographical regions in China and neighbouring countries to the north. The diseases are associated with localised geological features in conjunction with geographical isolation and restricted food availability. Although there are well known and extensive regions of selenium-deficient soils in other countries, including New Zealand, neither KD nor KBD has been found to occur outside China and its northern neighbours. However, illnesses that show some of the features of KD and are related to selenium deficiency are not confined to areas of endemic selenium-related diseases. These non-endemic conditions are normally associated with an inadequate selenium status, which may be iatrogenic in origin or due to other causes. Most of the cases reported in the literature are single and isolated instances of selenium deficiency. However, although uncommon, these cases can have wide implications since they are sometimes the result of accepted medical practices and therapies. A review of these practices may be called for so that others undergoing similar treatments are not exposed to risk of selenium deficiency.

Keywords

Brown Adipose Tissue Iodine Deficiency GSHPx Activity Selenium Level Selenium Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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