Selenium in health and disease I

The agricultural connection
  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

Our present knowledge of the role of selenium in human health and disease owes much to the work of agricultural scientists. The stimulus which in most cases set these investigators on their way was an economic one—recognition that selenium was responsible for considerable losses to farmers in areas where the element occurred in high concentrations in the soil. Later they came to realise that it was not just selenium toxicity but, on an even more widespread and serious scale, selenium deficiency in agricultural soils that caused economic loss to farmers.

Keywords

Sodium Selenite Selenium Deficiency Selenium Supplementation Liver Necrosis Dietary Selenium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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