Biological roles of selenium

  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

The environment is the primary source of all the selenium we consume in food and drink. What ultimately determines whether the amount we take in is inadequate or excessive, or just enough to meet our needs, is a variety of factors that control the level and the form of selenium at the very beginning of the food chain.

Keywords

Glutathione Peroxidase Selenium Concentration GSHPx Activity Selenium Level Glutathione Peroxidase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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