In Vitro-Separation of Active Phagocytes for Temporary Extracorporeal Phagocytosis Assist by Magnetic Microbeads

  • Steffen Mitzner
  • Jan Stange
  • Jens Freytag
  • Piotr Peszynski
  • Stefan Aldinger
  • Ursula Kaben
  • Barbara Nebe
  • Bruno Ringel
  • Reinhardt Schmidt
Chapter

Abstract

The human phagocytosis system represents a major immunological defense barrier. At the onset of bacterial sepsis the phagocytosis capacity of blood neutrophils markedly decreases to values below 30% of normal. Therefore it seems a reasonable therapeutic approach to support the phagocytosis system by an extracorporeal phagocytosis device. We demonstrate in vitro-data showing that phagocytosis of relevant amounts of pathogenic bacteria and fungi can be achieved in suitable bioreactor-systems. The human promyelocytic cell line HL-60 was differentiated towards neutrophils upon stimulation with all trans-retinoic acid (atRA). The phagocytosis index of stimulated HL-60 was higher than in normal peripheral blood neutrophils. The HL-60 phagocytosis among others comprises internalization of living and dead E.coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Highly relevant concentrations of Candida albi-cans could be removed from cell culture-medium (2×105 C. alb./ml). Stimulated phagocytes can be separated by magnetic microbeads from inactive cells to increase the efficiency of the system. In conclusion phagocytosis assist seems to be an interesting approach to extracorporeal detoxification in sepsis and neutropenia lowering the microbial burden of the blood.

Keywords

Candida Albicans Phagocytic Function Intracellular Killing Active Phagocyte Phagocytosis Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steffen Mitzner
    • 1
  • Jan Stange
    • 1
  • Jens Freytag
    • 1
  • Piotr Peszynski
    • 1
  • Stefan Aldinger
    • 1
  • Ursula Kaben
    • 2
  • Barbara Nebe
    • 1
  • Bruno Ringel
    • 3
  • Reinhardt Schmidt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of RostockRostockGermany
  2. 2.Department of DermatologyGermany
  3. 3.Institute for ImmunologyRostockGermany

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