Sugar and Other Sweeteners

  • Raymond D. Moroz
  • Charles D. Broeg

Abstract

Sugar and starch are among those organic “chemicals” found so abundantly in nature that no serious efforts have been made to synthesize them commercially from coal (or petroleum), air, and water. Both are available at such concentrations in some plants that sizable industries have resulted from growing those plants and extracting carbohydrates therefrom.

Keywords

Sugar Industry Cane Sugar High Fructose Corn Syrup Dextrose Equivalent Bone Char 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond D. Moroz
    • 1
  • Charles D. Broeg
  1. 1.Crompton & Knowles CorporationUSA

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