Industrial Wastewater and Hazardous Materials Treatment Technology

  • William J. Lacy

Abstract

The gravest water quality issue now facing the nation is the disposal of industrial wastes. Other major environmental problems include medical wastes, hazardous wastes, and toxic contamination of the nation’s streams and groundwater. Municipal waste disposal and landfill issues also are very serious concerns.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Solid Waste Anaerobic Digestion Biochemical Oxygen Demand Hazardous Waste 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • William J. Lacy

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