Economic Aspects of the Chemical Industry

  • F. E. BaileyJr.
  • J. V. Koleske

Abstract

Within the formal departments of science at the traditional university, chemistry has grown to have a unique status because of its close correspondence with an industry and a branch of engineering—the chemical industry and chemical engineering. There is no biology industry, but drugs, pharmaceuticals, and agriculture are closely related disciplines. There is no physics industry although power generation, electricity, and electronics indus-tries do exist. But connected with chemistry, there is an industry. This unusual corre-spondence probably came about because in chemistry one makes things from basic raw materials—chemicals—and the science and the use of chemicals more or less grew up together during the past century.

Keywords

Chemical Industry Vinyl Chloride Propylene Oxide Methyl Acetate Vinyl Chloride Monomer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. E. BaileyJr.
  • J. V. Koleske
    • 1
  1. 1.CharlestonUSA

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