Application of Chitosan for Treatment of Wastewaters

  • Hong Kyoon No
  • Samuel P. Meyers
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 163)

Abstract

Significant volumes of wastewaters, with organic and inorganic contaminants such as suspended solids, dyes, pesticides, toxicants, and heavy metals, are discharged from various industries. These wastewaters create a serious environmental problem and pose a threat to water quality when discharged into rivers and lakes. Thus, such contaminants must be effectively removed to meet increasingly stringent environmental quality standards. It is becoming increasingly recognized that the nontoxic and biodegradable biopolymer chitosan can be used in wastewater treatment (Peniston and Johnson 1970).

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Volatile Solid Cheese Whey Chitosan Derivative Chitosan Bead 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong Kyoon No
    • 1
  • Samuel P. Meyers
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and TechnologyCatholic University of Taegu-HyosungHayangSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food ScienceLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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