Current Trends in Interaction Research

  • Edward M. Schortman
  • Patricia A. Urban
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

This chapter seeks to identify major components of a developing interaction paradigm. As mentioned in the introductory chapter, such intellectual frameworks consist of the analytical units, assumptions, and unsolved questions which direct systematic research into any topic (Kuhn 1970). The particular paradigm we are attempting to elucidate focuses on predictable relations among extrasocietal contacts and sociopolitical changes. The views advanced here are those of the authors alone. Although considerably inspired by the chapters in this volume, and the “schools of thought” they represent, there is no reason to assume that the contributors concur with the ideas we express. Our objective, in fact, is not just to exercise an editor’s prerogative to have the last word. Rather, we are writing this essay as a contribution to the formulation of an interaction paradigm and not under any delusion that our statements are definitive. If the chapter encourages constructive debate on the systemic relations between sociopolitical change and intersocietal contacts, then it will have been successful.

Keywords

Complex Society Ancient World Interaction Research Interaction Paradigm American Antiquity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward M. Schortman
    • 1
  • Patricia A. Urban
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and SociologyKenyon CollegeGambierUSA

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