Heating and Cooling Applications

  • Roger B. Boulton
  • Vernon L. Singleton
  • Linda F. Bisson
  • Ralph E. Kunkee
Chapter

Abstract

Process heat transfer is used at several points during winemaking to control or retard unwanted enzyme, microbial, and chemical reactions. These will generally include:
  1. 1.

    Must cooling in association with juice draining or skin contact prior to fermentation

     
  2. 2.

    Juice cooling prior to fermentation

     
  3. 3.

    Both the heating and cooling requirements of high-temperature short-time (HTST) denaturation of enzymes or to kill microorganisms

     
  4. 4.

    Heat removal for temperature control during fermentations

     
  5. 5.

    Cooling of wines for control of temperature during storage

     
  6. 6.

    Cooling of wines to enhance potassium bitartrate crystallization

     
  7. 7.

    Energy recovery by interchanging heat between warm and cold wines

     
  8. 8.

    Heating of juice for thermovinification

     
  9. 9.

    Cooling and air conditioning of the winery or aging cellars.

     

Keywords

Heat Transfer Heat Transfer Coefficient Heat Exchanger Refrigeration System Heat Transfer Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger B. Boulton
    • 1
  • Vernon L. Singleton
    • 1
  • Linda F. Bisson
    • 1
  • Ralph E. Kunkee
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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