Prehistoric Exchange in the Lower Mississippi Valley

  • Robert H. LaffertyIII
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The Lower Mississippi River Valley was a pivotal geographic feature in the prehistoric exchange systems of central North America because it was the longest north—south corridor for river-borne trade in the continent. The river and intertwined swamps were a significant barrier to east—west overland movement. Paradoxically, this caused many of the major prehistoric trade centers to be on the fringes of the Lower Mississippi River valley.

Keywords

American Antiquity Marine Shell Middle Woodland Conch Shell Shell Bead 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. LaffertyIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Mid-Continental Research Associates, Inc.SpringdaleUSA

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