Particle Characteristics

  • Daniel J. Shanefield

Abstract

The Sizes Needed for Closest Packing. Because of the fact that close contact between powder particles is necessary for effective sintering, it is important to optimize the way that the particles pack together in the green body. If the particles were spheres, and they were arranged in the “closest packing” that is geometrically possible, they would occupy 74% of the volume, with empty spaces (small “pores”) occupying the rest of the volume. An illustration of just three of these spheres is at the top of Fig. 5.1. The percentage of the volume that is occupied by the solid spheres is listed at the upper left corner of Table 5.1. In real ceramic green bodies, the particles are rarely spherical, although they are often spheres that are somewhat distorted. Also, they are very rarely in the closest packed configuration, although sometimes they can be nearly closest packed, and it is instructive to compare the ideal case to these.

Keywords

Methylene Blue Close Packing Ceramic Powder Packing Fraction Particle Packing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Shanefield
    • 1
  1. 1.Rutgers UniversityUSA

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