Superconductivity Applications

  • M. Neuberger
  • D. L. Grigsby
  • W. H. VeazieJr.

Abstract

It is only comparatively recently that major applications for superconductors have been sucessfully demonstrated. Of the various applications presented in this chapter, only superconducting magnets and laboratory instruments offer significant use of superconducting materials and principles. An extensive literature review of superconducting devices covering the period 1959 to March 1967 was compiled by Goree and Edelsack (1).* The U.S. Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, Cryogenic Data Center, publishes SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES AND MATERIALS (2) which surveys the literature on a quarterly basis. The Cryogenic Data Center has issued bibliographies on superconducting motors and generators (3), devices for measuring magnetic field strength and direction (4), detectors (5), transformers (6), transmission lines (7), amplifiers (8), and magnets (9). The references provided by these sources and those included at the end of this chapter, will indicate to the reader of this volume of the HANDBOOK OF ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, many of the benefits and advantages inherent in superconductors.

Keywords

Power Transmission National Bureau Josephson Junction Superconducting Magnet Power Transmission Line 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Neuberger
    • 1
  • D. L. Grigsby
    • 1
  • W. H. VeazieJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronic Properties Information CenterHughes Aircraft CompanyCulver CityUSA

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