Cloning and Expression of Adrenergic and Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes

  • J. Craig Venter
  • Claire M. Fraser
  • Fu-Zon Chung
  • Anthony R. Kerlavage
  • Doreen A. Robinson
  • Jeannine D. Gocayne
  • Michael G. FitzGerald
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 236)

Abstract

We have extensively characterized the structure and evolution of the adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. This analysis has included studies with monoclonal antibodies, protein purification, target size analysis, gene cloning and sequencing and gene expression (1–7). Based upon the results of biochemical and immunological studies, we proposed that adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are highly conserved proteins. This hypothesis has been confirmed by gene cloning experiments which have provided the primary structures of a number of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors.

Keywords

Adenylate Cyclase Guanine Nucleotide Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptor Putative Transmembrane Domain Hydropathy Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Craig Venter
    • 1
  • Claire M. Fraser
    • 1
  • Fu-Zon Chung
    • 1
  • Anthony R. Kerlavage
    • 1
  • Doreen A. Robinson
    • 1
  • Jeannine D. Gocayne
    • 1
  • Michael G. FitzGerald
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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