Spectroscopic and Magnetic Properties of Metal π-Complexes

  • Minoru Tsutsui
  • Morris N. Levy
  • Akira Nakamura
  • Mitsuo Ichikawa
  • Kan Mori

Abstract

Selected physical properties such as spectroscopy and magnetic chemistry reveal useful data on the general skeletal arrangement, bond strength, energy, and valency of metal π-complexes. In this chapter some of the details of infrared spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectra, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and oxidation state are discussed in terms of the characterizations of metal π-complexes.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrum Electric Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minoru Tsutsui
    • 1
  • Morris N. Levy
    • 2
  • Akira Nakamura
    • 3
  • Mitsuo Ichikawa
    • 4
  • Kan Mori
    • 5
  1. 1.Chemistry DepartmentTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Chemical and Solvent DistillersAstoriaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Synthetic ChemistryOsaka UniversityToyonaka City, OsakaJapan
  4. 4.Research LaboratoriesJapan Synthetic Rubber CompanyKawasaki CityJapan
  5. 5.Basic Research DivisionJapan Synthetic Rubber CompanyKawasaki CityJapan

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