Nature of the π-Complex Bond

  • Minoru Tsutsui
  • Morris N. Levy
  • Akira Nakamura
  • Mitsuo Ichikawa
  • Kan Mori

Abstract

The bonding in transition metal complexes has been described by three different theories: crystal field theory (CFT), valence bond theory (VBT), and molecular orbital theory (MOT). Detailed descriptions of these three approaches are given in the standard inorganic texts and are not repeated here. However, some general statements concerning the applicability of these various bonding descriptions for metal π-complexes are noted.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Transition Metal Complex Atomic Orbital Molecular Orbital Theory Effective Atomic Number 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minoru Tsutsui
    • 1
  • Morris N. Levy
    • 2
  • Akira Nakamura
    • 3
  • Mitsuo Ichikawa
    • 4
  • Kan Mori
    • 5
  1. 1.Chemistry DepartmentTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Chemical and Solvent DistillersAstoriaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Synthetic ChemistryOsaka UniversityToyonaka City, OsakaJapan
  4. 4.Research LaboratoriesJapan Synthetic Rubber CompanyKawasaki CityJapan
  5. 5.Basic Research DivisionJapan Synthetic Rubber CompanyKawasaki CityJapan

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