Personality and Intellectual Capabilities in Sport Psychology

  • Gershon Tenenbaum
  • Michael Bar-Eli
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

More than four decades ago, philosophers Dewey and Bentley (1949) argued that there are three phases in the development of theories in each scientific discipline: (a) self-action, in which objects are regarded as behaving under their own power; (b) interaction, in which objects are regarded as being in a causal interaction where one acts upon another; and (c) process transaction, in which objects are regarded as relating to one another within a system. Within psychology, it has long been debated as to which source accounts for most of the variance in human behavior (Houts, Cook, & Shadish, 1986; Kenrick & Funder, 1988; Pervin, 1985). For instance, Ekehammar (1974) differentiated between “personologism” (which advocates stable, intraorganismic constructs as the main determinants of behavioral variance) and “situationism” (which emphasizes situational factors as the main source of be-havioral variance). It seemed to Ekehammar that personality psychology was moving toward being governed by interactionism. The latter “can be regarded as the synthesis of personologism and situationism, which implies that neither the person nor the situation per se is emphasized, but the interaction of these two factors is regarded as the main source of behavioral variation” (p. 1026).

Keywords

Cognitive Style Choice Reaction Time Sensation Seeker Achievement Motivation Human Kinetic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gershon Tenenbaum
    • 1
  • Michael Bar-Eli
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia
  2. 2.Ribstein Center for Research and Sport Medicine SciencesWingate Institute for Physical Education and SportNetanyaIsrael

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