Cognitive and Attentional Processes in Personality and Intelligence

  • Gerald Matthews
  • Lisa Dorn
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to discuss progress in relating intelligence and personality to constructs based on information-processing theory. There has been extensive research on correlations between indices of information-processing functions and psychometric intelligence and personality measures, although it is relatively rare for intelligence and personality to be assessed within the same study. Because of the correlational nature of the evidence, we must tread carefully in drawing conclusions from it, and so we begin with an outline of the interpretative problems involved.

Keywords

Free Recall Trait Anxiety Attentional Process Work Memory Capacity Digit Span 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Matthews
    • 1
  • Lisa Dorn
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of DundeeDundeeScotland
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamEngland

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