Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation as an Integrated Task of Clinicians and Families

Local and National Experiences
  • Anna Mazzucchi
  • Raffaella Cattelani
  • Sabina Cavatorta
  • Mario Parma
  • Anna Veneri
  • Giuliana Contini
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Within the vast context of rehabilitation, that of the traumatic brain injured (TBI) has taken on a highly and specific relevance, not only because of the extreme seriousness of this pathological condition and its inevitable social implications, but also on account of the enormous amount of cultural and methodological research that it requires. Considering its difficult and intense evolution, it is hardly surprising that, although dating back to recent times (1970s), the history of TBI rehabilitation appears as a theme of particular interest in itself. In this light, the analysis made by Rosenthal (1996) seems particularly noteworthy.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Emergency Medical Service Family System Family Association Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Mazzucchi
    • 1
  • Raffaella Cattelani
    • 1
  • Sabina Cavatorta
    • 1
  • Mario Parma
    • 1
  • Anna Veneri
    • 2
  • Giuliana Contini
    • 2
  1. 1.Neuropsychology and Neurorehabilitation Unit, Institute of NeurologyUniversity of ParmaParmaItaly
  2. 2.Trauma Association of ParmaParmaItaly

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