The Second Generation of Hibakusha, Atomic Bomb Survivors

A Psychologist’s View
  • Mikihachiro Tatara
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Fifty years ago, two atomic bombs were dropped on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, instantly killing close to 70,000 people. Some were evaporated. Their shapes remained as shadows, like negatives from exposed film, on the stone walls and steps. Another 20,000 died within 2 weeks. In all, more than 100,000 people died from the blast and the radiation released by the bombs.

Keywords

Social Stigma Atomic Bomb Stone Wall Atomic Bomb Survivor Physical Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikihachiro Tatara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHiroshima UniversityHiroshima 739Japan

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