Children of Nazis

A Psychodynamic Perspective
  • Gertrud Hardtmann
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

The Nazi disaster—the most devastating period in German history for the lives, the culture, and the souls it ruined—is still only a marginal subject in German psychological research. In fact, up to the early 1980s, there were hardly any scientific publications. There are probably three reasons for the lack of research about this topic in Germany: (1) the long time of latency between the end of the Nazi area in 1945 and the beginning of the investigations in the 1980s; (2) the absence of theory to conceptualize the research data; and (3) the fact that all the investigators in Germany are part of the problem they are investigating.

Keywords

Projective Identification Concentration Camp External Reality German Child Social Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gertrud Hardtmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Technical UniversityBerlinGermany

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