AIDS and Its Traumatic Effects on Families

  • Barbara H. Draimin
  • Carol Levine
  • Lockhart McKelvy
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Hardly over, perhaps barely begun, the epic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) involves multigenerational losses and redefinitions of individual, family, and community roles and responsibilities. An AIDS diagnosis dramatically alters the emotional climate of the family system. It creates a profound sense of dislocation in the timing and order of major life events. Years of parenting are compressed into a few, and roles are reversed. A 12-year-old girl changes her mother’s diapers. A 65-year-old grandmother takes over the care of the seven children of her three dead daughters. A 17-year-old promises her dying mother that she will take care of her younger brothers and sisters, and not let them be separated.

Keywords

York City Traumatic Effect Family Therapy Emotional Climate Mortality Weekly Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara H. Draimin
    • 1
  • Carol Levine
    • 2
  • Lockhart McKelvy
    • 1
  1. 1.The Family CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Families and Health Care ProjectUnited Hospital FundNew YorkUSA

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