An Examination of Competing Explanations for the Intergenerational Transmission of Domestic Violence

  • Ronald L. Simons
  • Christine Johnson
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Although domestic violence has been a feature of most societies throughout human history (Levinson, 1989), only within the last 25 years have we come to view it as a serious social problem. North America and Western Europe have been the location for much of the research on this topic, but in recent years, researchers from other parts of the world have also begun to investigate this issue. Studies of domestic violence consistently find that childhood exposure to family violence significantly increases the chances that an individual will be violent toward his or her spouse or children during adulthood. This intergenerational pattern is often referred to as a “cycle of violence” (Gelles & Cornell, 1990; Steinmetz, 1987).

Keywords

Domestic Violence Child Abuse Antisocial Behavior Family Violence Corporal Punishment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Simons
    • 1
  • Christine Johnson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Center for Family Research in Mental HealthIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  2. 2.Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Family Research in Mental HealthIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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