The Effects of Massive Trauma on Cambodian Parents and Children

  • J. David Kinzie
  • J. Boehnlein
  • William H. Sack
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to describe the effects of the Pol Pot trauma on two generations of Cambodians and their families. The time since the end of the Pol Pot era (1979) is still too short to document a second-generation effect, but we now have some data on the psychiatric effects this trauma has inflicted on young and old Cambodians, and the impact refugee status has had on Cambodian family life.

Keywords

Ptsd Symptom Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Psychiatric Effect Cambodian Refugee Massive Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. David Kinzie
    • 1
  • J. Boehnlein
    • 1
  • William H. Sack
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryOregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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