Non-invasive Mechanical Ventilation and Prevention of Pneumonia in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

  • M. Antonelli
  • G. Mercurio
  • M. A. Pennisi

Abstract

Critically ill patients are at high risk of developing nosocomial infections due to their severity of illness, immunosuppression, and prolonged hospitalization. Among nosocomial infections, pneumonia affects from 20 to 30% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and is the leading cause of death [1]. The use of the endotracheal (ET) tube to deliver ventilatory support is the single most important predisposing factor for developing nosocomial bacterial pneumonia [2]. Fagon et al. [3] have demonstrated that the risk of pneumonia is incremental in ventilated patients and increases by about 1% per day of continuous invasive ventilation.

Keywords

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patient Acute Respiratory Failure Nosocomial Pneumonia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Antonelli
  • G. Mercurio
  • M. A. Pennisi

There are no affiliations available

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