Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: A Critical Care and Emergency Medicine Approach

  • J. Varon
  • P. E. Marik
Conference paper

Abstract

Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of injury and death due to poisoning worldwide [1, 2]. This colorless, odorless and toxic gas is a product of incomplete combustion of any carbon-containing fuel. The sources of carbon monoxide are plentiful, and with the exception of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide is the most abundant pollutant present in the lower atmosphere [3]. Motor vehicles and other internal-combustion engines, heaters, appliances that use carbon-based fuels, and household fires are the main sources of this poison. Carbon monoxide poisoning is also the most common cause of death in combustion-related inhalation injury [1, 2]. The true incidence of non-lethal carbon monoxide exposure and poisoning is not known and subacute unrecognized cases occur.

Keywords

Carbon Monoxide Hyperbaric Oxygen Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Akinetic Mutism Motor Vehicle Exhaust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Varon
  • P. E. Marik

There are no affiliations available

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