The Impact of Visual Impairments on Psychosocial Development

  • Sally M. Rogow
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Few people can imagine life without sight. Vision provides immediate and richly detailed information about the physical world and facilitates communication with eye gaze, facial expressions, and body postures. Without sight, the gathering of information is dependent on conscious attention to other senses and abilities to make adaptations and adjustment to the environment (Lowenfeld, 1981). Psychosocial development in children may be compromised when the rich social input that vision offers is not available.

Keywords

Social Skill Visual Impairment Social Competence Psychosocial Development Impaired Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally M. Rogow
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and Special EducationUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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