Psychiatric Disorders in Children with Speech, Language, and Communication Disorders

  • Christiane A. M. Baltaxe
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Language and the ability to communicate are important human functions that play a significant and pervasive role in all aspects of human growth and development. Linguists note that all languages share certain properties despite their superficial disparities. They find an explanation for these similarities in the anatomical and physiological structures of the brain shared by speakers of diverse languages (Lenneberg, 1967).

Keywords

Psychiatric Disorder Adolescent Psychiatry Child Psychiatry Language Impairment Pervasive Developmental Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christiane A. M. Baltaxe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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