Autism

  • Marjorie H. Charlop-Christy
  • Susan E. Kelso
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Autism was first classified as a distinct disorder in 1943, when Leo Kanner identified 11 children who were differentiated from children with other disorders by the unusual characteristics they all shared. The behavioral features Kanner observed and described included a lack of communicative speech, language disturbances such as echolalia and pronoun reversal, excellent rote memory, difficulty in understanding abstract concepts, disturbances of nonverbal behavior (e.g., stereotyped behavior and lack of imaginary play), and an unawareness of other people, or “autistic aloneness” (Kanner, 1943). In addition, these children had displayed symptoms since infancy, had normal physical developmental histories, and appeared to be serious and intelligent.

Keywords

Social Skill Apply Behavior Analysis Video Modeling Play Skill Infantile Autism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marjorie H. Charlop-Christy
    • 1
  • Susan E. Kelso
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyClaremont McKenna CollegeClaremontUSA
  2. 2.Claremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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