Ethnic Variation in the Family

The Elusive Trend toward Convergence
  • Robert Aponte
  • Bruce A. Beal
  • Michelle E. Jiles

Abstract

A recurring theme in the literature on “the family” is the idea that the functions, forms, “values,” or lifestyles of families will vary strongly by ethnic background. However, in sharp contrast with earlier times, latterday family diversity is more likely to be celebrated than castigated. The shift in perspective has doubtlessly elicited great satisfaction among those—usually minority—scholars whose efforts helped bring forth the change (Mirande, 1977; Staples & Mirande, 1980). In addition, representatives of the “helping professions” (e.g., social workers) often welcome the shift because it facilitates the incorporation of more appropriately varied modalities for “servicing” their increasingly multicultural clientele (e.g., Devore & Schlesinger, 1987; McDade, 1995).

Keywords

Family Size Black Woman Labor Force Participation Family Diversity Black Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Aponte
    • 1
  • Bruce A. Beal
  • Michelle E. Jiles
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIndiana University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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