Comparative Perspectives

  • Gary R. Lee

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to apply the method of comparative research to the study of families and family relations. The phrase comparative research, in the social sciences, is literally a redundancy. Research is inherently comparative (Kohn, 1987; Lee, 1982, 1984; Lee and Haas, 1993; Swanson, 1971). Any assessment of covariation or correlation between two variables is in fact a comparative statement: Cases that differ in terms of values of an independent variable are compared to ascertain whether they tend to be similar or different on a dependent variable. In this literal sense, all scientific knowledge is comparative.

Keywords

Family Structure Adult Child Nuclear Family Family System Comparative Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary R. Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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